Linum campanulatum - yellow flax

Publié le 8 Juin 2022

Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax
Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax
Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax

Linum campanulatum - yellow flax

Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax
Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax
Linum campanulatum - yellow  flax

Linum campanulatum - yellow flax

This is an automatic translation in English from the original text in French

Here is a spectacular plant that forms small bright bushes that you will see during your holidays in the Mediterranean scrub (or during all its flowering if you live there) or like us in a garden. Roland


 Scientific name: Linum campanulatum L., 1753

 Origin of the name: comes from the Greek “linon”, flax and from the Latin “campanulum”, which means “bell-shaped”.

 German/ dialect: Glöckiger-Lein

English: yellowflax

Date and place of observation: July 8 at the botanical garden of Saverne (67), photos taken on June 10 near Sisteron (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence)

Family of plants: Yellow Flax is part of the Linaceae family which includes 290 species divided into 10 genera, flowers, lianas and some trees. These plants are present almost everywhere but rather in cold to tropical areas. They have a similar appearance to caryophyllaceae, the carnation family. The leaves are entire and arranged in a spiral. Their symmetry is of order 5, 5 free petals, 5 free or fused sepals at the base, 5 stamens or 5 fertile and 5 sterile stamens, 2 to 5 fused carpels. Linaceae are important especially for cultivated flax, Linum usitatissimum, widely used for its fiber and its seeds.

Category: perennial Habit: medium bushy plant with large yellow flowers Height: 10 to 30 cm high.

Stem: woody, glabrous, branched with long annual branches

Leaves: the leaves are entire, subopposite and sessile (without the small stalk that usually holds the leaves). They are lanceolate, or oval, and measure about 4 cm long and 1 wide. Towards the top of the stem their width decreases to become linear.

Flowering: April to June

Flowers: yellow in color, 3 cm long and made up of 5 petals, the end of which is oval and not indented. The calyx surrounds the corolla with its 5 free, linear sepals, and twice as small as the petals. The pistil ends in 5 stigmas carried by 5 styles of 0.5 mm. The flowers are bent before flowering and then straighten.

Pollination: by insects Fruits: round fruits called capsules. It is through ten slits that the seeds of less than 1 mm, smooth, escape at maturity.

Habitat: sunny places with poor or stony soil rich in alkalines such as limestone lawns, scrubland, embankments and edges of roads up to 1400m.

Possible confusion: no, it is really typical but there is a sister species, very close, Linum flavum in Mediterranean countries

Protection status: common plant without protection status but classified Znieff in the Midi-Pyrénées region. The ZNIEFF, Natural Areas of Faunistic and Floristic Ecological Interest aim to identify and describe sectors with strong biological capacities and a good state of conservation.

Food and medicinal use: nothing found In the Linaceae of our country, it is the cultivated Flax, with large blue flowers, Linum usitatissimum which has remarkable food and medicinal value.

Text, photos, bibliography Roland Gissinger (Anab)


 Bibliographic sources see biodiversity index

Linum usitatissimum  (common flax or linseed)
Linum usitatissimum  (common flax or linseed)

Linum usitatissimum (common flax or linseed)

Rédigé par ANAB

Publié dans #English files

Commenter cet article
H
The article is well presented, the clear illustration of the plant to be described . The text is clear to read and logically presented. Descriptions are followed by examples and definitions of words and terms that may be unfamiliar to the non expert. I like the way the piece is set out with subheadings. The reader becomes clear about one aspect of the plant before the next one is introduced.<br /> The piece leads the reader to discover more about the plant. It is good to know the site exists if needed.
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A
Thank you very much Hilda. You are really too kind with your appreciations.<br /> <br /> Roland
C
Apart from the occasional use of a word that one does not immediately suit the context, the translation is clear and easy enough to read.
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R
Clare, thank you very much for checking this automatic translation.<br /> Have a nice evening<br /> <br /> Roland
T
I have received very positive comments from two friends who (for data protection reasons) do not wish to post their comments themselves.<br /> Pam is an artist and keen plants woman; she likes the ANAB blog, its presentation and thinks that the translation is easily readable. <br /> Joan is a former colleague as well as a friend. She is a keen gardener. When she was professionally active, Translation was her specialism (as with Davies, below). The fact that they give the automatic translation the thumbs up is a ringing endorsement.
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A
Toll I am very glad to read the comments of your friends Pam and Joan.<br /> Please, transmit them my best regards and my best thanks for spending time for this test<br /> Toll, thanks a lot for your help<br /> <br /> Roland.
D
I already commented on the accuracy of the English translation, and can only agree with the comment from White, below, the photographs are lovely.
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A
Thanks a lot dear Davies for this service and for your positive comment on our website<br /> <br /> Roland
A
Thanks a lot dear Davies for this service and for positives comment on our website<br /> <br /> Roland
W
I am an English speaker and just wanted to comment on the automatic English translation. On the whole it is understandable, a good automatic translation which will enable a wider reading of this useful website. The photographs of the plants are very clear particularly showing them in close up as well as the habitat they grow in. Great for identification and increasing knowledge of where to look.
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A
Thank you very much Dear White for the time you have taken, trying to read this article.<br /> We are lucky that artificial intelligence has made big progres in translation.<br /> <br /> Than you also for apreaciation our blog;<br /> At this moment we only make tests and have not take our decision for translating all our coming articles.<br /> Roland
T
There is no doubt that an enormous amount of time is required to produce a quality blog such as ANAB's.<br /> There are only 24 hours in a day, and only a very small number of ANAB members actively contribute to the production of the daily blog. <br /> Limiting your project to PLANTS only is already a brilliant achievement! Thank you for even thinking of it.
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W
I am grateful to a French colleague who recently made me aware of the ANBAS website and am finding the weekly identification challenge both educational and stimulating. My knowledge of French is fairly basic, so having access to the computer-generated translation into English is helpful as well as being adequate for my needs. <br /> <br /> The page is further enhanced by the excellent quality of the images; and the way the descriptions are systematically presented enhances the ability to identify and classify the subject. The inclusion of an automatic translation into English should extend the international reach of this very useful web site.
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R
Dear Mr Wilkinson,<br /> <br /> It is very kind from your to appreciate so much our website and introduce it for new readers who are english readers. <br /> In the same moment, I admire you trying to understand our articles in French.<br /> <br /> These translations in english are made to open our website to new readers. This tests are made depending if we have enough time to make double articles. Each article has to be create separately. After the automatic translation which does not take time, we have to organize and clarify it to have a better visibilty. After that all the pictures are re-insert. <br /> <br /> I hope you shall continue to find some interest in our articles.<br /> Sorry for my poor english.<br /> <br /> <br /> Roland
T
This is a very informative article. The photos are superb and the presentation is very clear. It is a very user-friendly blog, and an excellent learning resource. It is my first port of call when I want to look up a plant. Even for readers who do not speak French as fluently as I do, the knowledge of fairly basic French would be sufficient to search plants in the archives and identify them. Latin being the international language in the botanical world, it is easy to cross-reference by using a website in English.<br /> <br /> The translation is automatic and it clearly lacks the awareness of a human translator (a native speaker of English). It might be useful to use a larger font - perhaps even upper case - to warn the reader that the translation is computer generated. The focus of the article is the plant in this case, not translation finesse. If the translation really became problematic, then it would be logical to simply look for an equivalent text in one's native language.
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D
Even though this is an automatic translation, it's very good and perfectly understandable (unlike some computer-generated translations).
R
Thank you very much Toll for appreciating our blog and for your explanations in using it for future readers. You have made it better than I can do.<br /> have a nice day<br /> Roland